Open Door Blog » Category: "Skills"
  • December 30, 2014

targetThink back to this time last year and the New Year’s resolutions and goals that you made – did you stick with them? If you’re like most people then probably not. What if this year could be different? It can!

TED tells us that there’s a science to setting goals. Kelly McGonigal, a psychologist at Stanford, shares four research-backed tips to help you craft and carry out successful goals below.

  • Choose a goal that matters
    Our brains are wired to love rewards so we often set simple goals but a meaningful goal requires going deeper. Think about what you want in the coming year and then ask yourself why you want that – three times in a row. This will drive home why that goal matters and that motivation can help you as you work toward that goal.
  • Focus on the process
    When we set goals, it’s easy to focus on the outcome when we’ve reached the goal. Ask yourself, what is the smallest thing I can do today that helps me reach my goal?
  • Frame your goals positively
    How you describe your goals makes a big difference. Focus on what you want to bring to life, not what you want to avoid.
  • Prepare for failure
    Moments of failure are inevitable but we can’t abandon the goal entirely when minor setbacks start piling up. Ask yourself, how am I likely to fail? That mental plan can help you react to things that might trip you up.

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Life Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • November 13, 2014

green traffic lightWhat is a master? It is someone who resonates with success. It’s a person whose mindset automatically attracts the right people, places, events, and opportunities, and the same mindset that allows the person to jump all over all of those opportunities with gusto, and without fear or hesitation.

I believe that while each of us can do many things well, there is really only one thing that we can truly master, and ironically, while it takes a lot of effort to become a master in what you do, there is no real effort necessary in the thing we can truly master, which is being who we are.

Each of us has a very unique makeup. That makeup, at its core, is perfect, and when we tap into our true core, our real gift to the world is revealed. When you share your true gift with the world, you have mastered your life.

Self-Mastery is made up of 3 parts:
1. Understanding that each of us has a unique gift offering to the world, and that such an offering comes when we are truly authentic.
2. Discovering (remembering) what exactly is our truly authentic self.
3. Sharing who we are with the world, in a way that only we can.

It’s not what you do that matters, nor as much how you do it. Mastering your life is about knowing who you really are, and how you express that in what you do. So instead of trying to better yourself to finally be at a place of deservedness, why not relax, and instead look within to find that which you were really seeking?

Self-Mastery means living an abundant, fulfilled, and enjoyable life. It means feeling in control without having to control anything or anyone. As a master, it means you are at the cause, instead of the effect of your life. Self-Mastery means resonating at a high frequency of energy, and attracting all we could ever want into our lives, and… with little or no effort. I think this is a great way to live.

Posted in Career Coaching, Rodas Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • September 12, 2014

You may be a seasoned professional, but it’s always smart to brush up on your professional etiquette. If you want to leave a positive and lasting impression, you need to know what to say and how to act.

Careerealism has created a quiz to test your professional etiquette. Take a minute to answer the professional etiquette questions below:

1. Your email address looks most like:
(a) John@JohnSmith.com
(b) John.Smith@gmail.com
(c) MrSmitty86@hotmail.com

2. After a job interview, you:
(a) Send a thank you note right away
(b) Send a thank you note a couple of days later
(c) Don’t send a thank you note

3. During meetings, you:
(a) Pay attention closely, ask questions and take notes
(b) Listen, but only speak up when you’re called on
(c) Text the entire time

4. Your emails are generally:
(a) Brief and to the point, but well-written
(b) Long and vague
(c) Riddles with both spelling and grammatical errors

Okay, you’ve probably caught on by now — if you answered mostly As you’re an expert at professional etiquette. You know exactly what to do when it comes to etiquette in the workplace. If you answered mostly Bs, you know the basics but there are a few situations that you don’t know how to answer. Mostly Cs? Your etiquette skills need work. Figure out which areas you need to improve and work on them.

You can take the full 10-question quiz below:

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Job Search, Rodas Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 22, 2014

1328153_73423240We make decisions all the time, some that require more thought than others. Regardless of the effort that is put into making a decision, it has to be accepted that some decisions will not be the best possible choice.

Many different techniques of decision making have been developed, ranging from simple rules of thumb to extremely complex procedures. The method usually depends on the nature of the decision and how complex it is. Below is one technique that will help you be more effective in decision making.

Seven Stages of Decision Making:

  1. Listing all possible solutions/options – Brainstorm all possible solutions and/or options available
  2. Setting a time scale and deciding who is responsible for the decision – Decide how much time is available to spend on the decision
  3. Information gathering – Collect all relevant information
  4. Weighing the risks involved – Decide how much risk you are willing to take
  5. Deciding on values – Depending on which values are considered important to you, different opinions will seem more or less attractive
  6. Weighing the pros and cons – Consider the possible advantages and disadvantages
  7. Making the decision!

Are you currently weighing a tough decision? Maybe you’re contemplating relocating for a career. Or perhaps you’re trying to decide whether to stay in your current career. Decisions like these are exactly what I am trained to help you answer and accomplish. Contact me to get started.

re you stuck trying to decide whether to stay in your field or leave? – See more at: http://rodascoaching.com/for-career-coaching/#sthash.iiv4AfLQ.dpuf
re you stuck trying to decide whether to stay in your field or leave? – See more at: http://rodascoaching.com/for-career-coaching/#sthash.iiv4AfLQ.dpuf

Posted in Career Coaching, Rodas Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 14, 2014

Boy SilhouetteWhat qualities make a strong leader? In one leadership study, qualities such as assertiveness, adaptability, intelligence and conscientiousness were cited as most important.

So how can you embrace these characteristics and become a better leader? Consider the following tips:

  1. Learn More About Your Leadership Style – Understanding your current leadership style is crucial. What are your strengths? Weaknesses? Take this leadership style quiz to asses your skills. Once you’ve determined areas that need some work, you can begin looking for ways  to improve your leadership abilities.
  2. Serve as a Role Model – Transformational leaders exemplify the behaviors and characteristics that they encourage in their followers. In other words, walk the walk and talk the talk. Work on modeling qualities that you would like to see in your team members to become a better leader.
  3. Listen and Communicate Effectively – Good leaders should express sincere care and concern for the members of their group both verbally and non-verbally. Keeping the lines of communication open ensures that group members feel able to make contributions.
  4. Have a Positive Attitude – Have an upbeat, optimistic attitude to be a source of inspiration for your followers. Even when things look bleak, try to stay positive.
  5. Motivate Your Followers – Inspirational motivation encourages followers to get into action. Being inspirational isn’t always easy but try being passionate about ideas, offering recognition and rewarding accomplishments.

What characteristics do you admire in great leaders?

Posted in career, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • February 6, 2014

emotional intelligence at workEmotional intelligence, commonly described as common sense, is defined as the ability to identify, assess, and control the emotions of oneself, of others, and of groups. Our emotional intelligence – the way we manage emotions, both our own and those of others – can play a critical role in determining our happiness and success, and a lot of your success and happiness is dependent on how you interact with others—in all jobs.

What can you do to sharpen your emotional intelligence? CareerBliss spoke with a number of psychologists and experts on the topic to pinpoint practical ways to practice strong emotional intelligence at work.

  1. Set an Intention – To control an outcome, you first have to clarify your intention.  “Before you start a project, meeting, or conversation, ask yourself: What is my intention? What do I most want to see happen from this?” says Amita Patel, owner and founder of Aligned Holistics. If you didn’t get what you were looking for, consider rephrasing your question. Looking inwardly can boost your interpersonal skills.
  2. Destress – Stress is kind of like a fog machine for your emotional intelligence. When you’re incredibly stressed out, it’s harder to see interactions clearly. For instance, “Many of us suffer from Email Apnea. Simply put, it means we hold our breath as we’re checking & writing email like a bomb is about to go off. Focus on creating a rhythm of calm & steady breaths,” Patel says. This can help you relax.
  3. Practice Kindness – Simple acts of kindness is always great for building strong relationships in general. Even if it’s as small as flashing a smile and saying “good morning.” Patel suggests: “Hold an elevator door, thank someone sincerely, or listen to someone mindfully without distractions.”

Putting these tactics into practice is a great way to connect your mind and heart for more success and happiness at work.

Posted in Career Coaching, health, Rodas Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • September 20, 2013

In addition to updating your resume, networking, and being active in your search, volunteering can also make you a stronger job candidate.  The Corporation for National and Community Service tracked more than 70,000 people between 2002 and 2012 and found that those who volunteer had a 27% better chance of finding a job than those who didn’t.

According to the authors of the study, acquiring skills or knowledge as a volunteer and then putting them to use may “demonstrate higher levels of capacity, potentially making the volunteer more attractive to and productive for employers.”

Forbes notes that while these results are important for all job seekers, they’re especially welcome news for the nation’s 4.4 million long-term unemployed (those out of work for at least six months.)  That’s because the longer you’re unemployed, the weaker your social networks tend to be and the harder it then becomes to get a referral.

Of all the employment-related benefits of volunteering, two stand out:

  • Volunteering helps lift job seekers’ spirits by making them feel needed and productive.
  • Volunteering lets you expand your network of contacts easily and effectively.

Employers like to hire people who can demonstrate that they’re motivated and hard working, even if they haven’t been getting paid for their efforts lately.  Volunteering can also provide you with an insider’s advantage if the nonprofit has an opening for a paid position.

How has volunteering helped your job search?  Have you gotten a job offer from a volunteer opportunity?  Leave a comment in the box below.

Posted in Job Search, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 20, 2013

Do you have effective workplace communication skills?  Workplace communication is the process of exchanging information, both verbal and non-verbal, and when done effectively, it ensures that all organizational objectives are achieved.

Effective communication in the workplace is important because it builds a cohesive and effective team.  It also provides employees with a clean prospective of what is required from them and what to do and expect.

According to Make a Dent Leadership, effective workplace communication happens when people:

  • Believe, (and witness), the people they work with (their leaders, peers or reports) are acting ethically and honestly
  • Know their opinions and ideas are meaningful to the success of the organization
  • Feel safe to express their opinions
  • Receive information equally and openly
  • Are highly trained in the requirements of the business, and able to interpret business information provided to them
  • Believe that actions are taken and decisions made with positive intent
  • Feel responsibility towards common goals
  • Make use of multiple channels and opportunities to interact and provide information

Do you need to sharpen your skills to communicate more effectively?  Take time to organize your thoughts before you speak so you can be as concise as possible.  Remember that effective communication skills go beyond verbal conversation.  Be aware of what messages you are sending with your body language (facial expressions and posture.)  Another important part of effective workplace communication is listening – not just hearing.  Really listen and understand what other people are saying to you.

Posted in Rodas Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.