Open Door Blog » Category: "Resume"
  • October 21, 2015

folder_free imageA recent study examined how today’s hiring managers evaluate candidates. As predicted, relevant work experience and skills are the most important aspects of a resume for hiring managers. 74 percent said the most important factor in hiring is the interview. Surprisingly, only 18 percent of hiring managers ranked cover letters as important, being outweighed by the interview, resume, references and soft skills.

As millennials take over management roles, they are relying on a broader set of methods for getting to know potential employees – candidate’s level of education, schools attended and GPA (27%, 13%, and 16%, respectively). With this set of hiring managers, the cover letter paragraphs about passions and key skills seems to be fading out.

So will a cover letter hurt you? Bloomberg points out that 55 percent of hiring managers said typos were the biggest turnoff, so why risk a typo when a cover letter is unlikely to help you land the job?

On the other hand, if you have a stellar cover letter, you may stand out as one of the few people still sending them.

Where do you stand on the cover letter debate? As a job seeker, do you still send them? As a hiring manager, how much weight do you place on these in the interview process? Leave your opinions in the comment box below.

Posted in Career Coaching, Interview, Resume, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • March 24, 2015

senior business man_paid forLooking for a job isn’t easy at any age, but those over 50 have a few extra hurdles to clear. Though the US economy is heating up, job competition is still strong.

If you’re over 50 and looking for a new role, it’s time to step your game up. Use these strategies from Careerealism to help employers see past your age.

  • Restrict work history to the last 15 years – Recruiters know that experience and skills can expire, which is why the majority of them prefer to see your more recent work experience on your resume and LinkedIn profile.
  • Eliminate education dates – Dates included on resumes for education could cause your candidacy to be overlooked.
  • Focus on your bottom-line impacts – Post-50 job seekers possess two valuable things: experience and achievements.
  • Freshen up your LinkedIn profile photo – Be honest with yourself about whether your photo or wardrobe ages you, and if it does, take appropriate action.
  • Be prepared to work with people younger than you – The older you are, the more likely it is that you will be interviewed or supervised by someone younger than you.

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search, LinkedIn, Resume, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • October 10, 2014

open handsSimply submitting your resume doesn’t ensure that it will land in the hands of a hiring manager, but there are a few things you can do to help your chances. Use these tips to get your resume past HR to those who actually make the hiring decisions:

  • Research keywords related to your role and insert them in your resume, LinkedIn profile and any other social media profiles that you use for professional purposes. There is always a chance that hiring managers could find you on social media and then ask for your resume. Adding keywords makes you easier to be found.
  • Do a search on LinkedIn to see how you are connected to your target company. You can ask for an introduction to a company employee through any first, second or third degree connections.
  • Mix online and offline techniques . Once you find someone to connect with using online research, consider taking the conversation offline by setting up a phone call or meeting at a networking event.

You can try a combination of these tactics or try the same ones repeatedly until you get the results you want. Remember, there is no magic solution but these are a few ways to improve your chances.

Posted in Resume, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 11, 2014

It’s possible that your resume could be saying the wrong thing about you. Your resume is a reflection of you and you don’t want recruiters thinking that you’re outdated because your resume is. Does your resume need an update? The Ladders blog will help you figure it out:

  • Listing a home phone number – In this mobile age, it’s importation to be accessible when a recruiter tries to contact you. Listing your cell phone number, rather than your home phone number, on your resume will enable you to maintain contact during the recruiter’s workday and will also give you control over who answers.
  • No profile URL – Recruiters are likely to look at a candidate’s social media profiles. Include a URL to your LinkedIn profile (or other social media professional profile) so recruiters don’t have to guess or mistake you for someone else.
  • Resume Objective – These days, a professional summary is better than an objective because it tells the employer how you’ll meet their needs. Sell your job candidacy by giving the reader your elevator pitch and explain what you’re best at and how you can provide value to a prospective employer.

Posted in Resume, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.