Open Door Blog » Category: "Networking"
  • December 5, 2014

According to The Ladders, networking is the number one way to land a job and advance your career! Not only are you ten times more likely to land a job when your resume is accompanied by a referral, but by getting an inside look at the company through your connection, you’re more likely to be a good fit.

As your calendar begins to fill up with holiday events, remember to make networking a priority. Below I’ve rounded-up some of my favorite networking blogs for you.

Networking When You Want a New Career
How do you answer “what do you do?” when you’re looking for a new career? Use these alternative conversation entry points to help you steer networking conversations with confidence.

Networking Effectively – The Key to a Successful Job Search
It is important in today’s job market to do whatever it takes for you to stand out in the crowd. Use these tips to make your networking effective in gaining employment.

Find New Ways to Network
Networking is a lifetime process. Even after you find your new position, it is important to continue networking throughout your career and life to build strong connections. Strong, healthy connections keep us happy, healthy, and moving forward to create the life we desire.

Posted in Networking, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • November 21, 2014

Thanksgiving 2Many people put their job search on hold during the holidays but Thanksgiving gatherings and events can be the perfect time to network. After all, networking is all about making a connection with people and using that connection to help one another. Before you bring up your job hunt at the table, review the tips below to make the most of your networking:

  • Identify what kind of help you’re looking for – Just asking for vague “job help” isn’t going to cut it. Spend some time figuring out the kind of help you need so you are able to make an intelligent request for specific, useful assistance.
  • Connect and research – Start connecting with relatives on LinkedIn and Facebook and use Google to find out more about their careers. Look for connectivity between what you need and the lives of your friends and family members: Where did you aunts and uncles and cousins go to school? Where do they work?
  • Practice you pitch – If you’re going to ask for help, you’ll want to give your listener a solid understanding of what it is you’re looking for and why they should help you out. Remember, how you ask is as important as what you say.

Posted in Career Coaching, Networking, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • October 24, 2014

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere are many different purposes for networking – to meet new people in your industry, to get your name out there, and even to find a new job. But how do you answer “what do you do?” when you’re looking for a new career? Do you talk about what you have been doing or what you wish to be doing? The Ladders have come up with alternative conversation entry points to help you steer networking conversations with confidence.

“I work in X industry doing Y.”
In this case, Y is your broader career goal rather than your current job description. The next question in the conversation will likely be about what you do and the future of your work.

“I am trying to figure out where to go from X, taking time to figure it out and plotting my next move.”
In this instance, X will be an explanation of the last work project you were excited about. Choose a project about which you know a great deal. Before you finish your conversation, ask the other person, “What do you think your next career move will be?” This conversation opener tends to create discussions about life in general.

“I’m learning about X right now, which is very exciting. What are you learning about in your work?”
With this response, you will likely be asked why and how you are learning X. If you are excited about learning and expanding your skill set, this is your perfect introduction.

With these alternative introductions, you can direct your conversations. Try writing out your answers to the conversation starters above so you will be ready to succeed at your next networking event.

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search, Networking, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • July 10, 2014

picnic tablesWe survived the long winter and summer is finally here! Between the pool parties and backyard BBQs, you don’t want to let your job search efforts slide. In fact, you can turn all of those parties into networking events that may lead you to your next great job opportunity.

So that you can enjoy your summer while also making the most of your job search, Huffington Post has created some good guidelines for your summer job search:

  • Keep it informal – If you meet someone that you feel could be a good professional contact, keep the conversation more personal and informal – don’t “talk shop” unless they initiate it. You don’t want to hurt a potentially great opportunity by being too aggressive.
  • Don’t forget to follow-up – If you were able to meet someone in a position to hire or just a great connection, introduce yourself. Then, follow-up a few days later on LinkedIn to see if they’d be interested in meeting for lunch or an informational interview.
  • Build a network – Although summer is a time to have fun, keeping in touch with a small network of people who are working towards the same goal will keep your job search on track. Use this group to stay up-to-date about new job opportunities and to hold yourself accountable. You can communicate in-person or online through email chains.
  • Re-evaluate your job search – Carve out a little time in your day to make sure the path you’re headed in is still the right one for you. Also assess and update your resume and skills. With a little extra time, you could take a class at a local college or volunteer to help with projects in your neighborhood. Not only will this keep your resume fresh but it will help you expand your network by meeting new people.

Of course summer is also for fun and relaxation, but don’t forget that a potential job opportunity may arise at your next summer gathering.

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search, Networking, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • July 1, 2013

Colorful FireworksAs you’re preparing to celebrate the 4th of July holiday, think about how you can integrate your job search into your upcoming events.  Life is full of networking opportunities and a 4th of July BBQ is no exception.

It’s okay to leverage your personal network.  Let your family and friends know that you’re in the job market.  Most people are happy to help, but they can’t help if they don’t know that you’re in the market for a new position.  Making them aware that you’re looking for a job can open new opportunities for you.

Remember, even if you meet someone who may not be able to help you in the immediate future, that doesn’t mean that they won’t be a meaningful connection down the road.

Posted in Job Search, Networking, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.