Open Door Blog » Category: "Job Search"
  • May 6, 2016

encore careerMany people get to a point in their lives when they have worked hard for decades but don’t want to work 40+ hours every week. An “encore career” refers to a career transition that takes place in the latter part of one’s career. Typically an encore career happens in social sector fields like education, nonprofits, the environment, and health care.

If you are thinking about pursuing an encore career, you are not alone. According to a recent study, nearly 9 million Americans between the ages of 44 and 70 have encore careers.

If you are considering an encore career, first consider these things:

  • Think about the skills that made you successful in your personal career and explore opportunities where those strengths can be used
  • Once you’ve chosen an area to pursue, catch up on industry news by subscribing to industry newsletters and joining relevant LinkedIn groups
  • When meeting with people regarding your encore career, be sure to promote the active part of your personality during networking activities and in interviews

You can see a list of resources for encore job seekers here.

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • January 15, 2016

calendar_free imageIt’s no coincidence that your New Year Resolutions coincide with the best time of the year to search for a new job. According to Wisebread, the beginning of the year is one of the the best times to begin your job search.

There are many factors that make this time of year the best for your job hunt. Winter is the time of year when the most decision makers are in the office at the same time. These decision makers often work together to make hiring choices. This is also the time when many companies tend to pick up the office work that slowed down in December. And many companies get their new budgets in January, which tends to be when hiring decisions can be made with confidence.

If you haven’t already started sending your resume out, don’t hesitate any longer!

Posted in Job Search, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • September 23, 2015

pen-and-paper_free imageFinding the right career – one that is rewarding, meaningful, and enjoyable – is one of the most challenging things a person will ever do. With today’s tough job market, it’s important that professionals find their competitive edge. An outside opinion can be helpful to guide you in times of uncertainty or in moments for motivation.

The Ladders points out that a career coach can help job seekers handle everything from resume consulting to interview training. Choosing the right coach can not only help you land a great job, but ensure it’s the right fit, giving you the long-term success you desire.

Here are some things a career coach can do for you:

Expert Career Advice
Before you launch your next job search, a career coach will act as an advisor to determine your skill set and long-term goals. Then they will help you come up with a strategy to achieve your goals.

Resume Review
A career coach will review your existing resume and provide tips on how to improve it. They can also review your LinkedIn profile.

Job Interview Training
A career coach can help you formulate responses to match your personal branding, so you’ll know how to answer difficult questions.

Do you feel stuck in your career? Do you want greater professional success? Career Coach Deborah Sakelaris is known for her exceptional personalized career coaching programs focused on client’s very unique needs. Her only focus is about getting real results and going above and beyond traditional routes to help you achieve your career goals. Contact Deborah today to learn more about Career Coaching.

 

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • March 24, 2015

senior business man_paid forLooking for a job isn’t easy at any age, but those over 50 have a few extra hurdles to clear. Though the US economy is heating up, job competition is still strong.

If you’re over 50 and looking for a new role, it’s time to step your game up. Use these strategies from Careerealism to help employers see past your age.

  • Restrict work history to the last 15 years – Recruiters know that experience and skills can expire, which is why the majority of them prefer to see your more recent work experience on your resume and LinkedIn profile.
  • Eliminate education dates – Dates included on resumes for education could cause your candidacy to be overlooked.
  • Focus on your bottom-line impacts – Post-50 job seekers possess two valuable things: experience and achievements.
  • Freshen up your LinkedIn profile photo – Be honest with yourself about whether your photo or wardrobe ages you, and if it does, take appropriate action.
  • Be prepared to work with people younger than you – The older you are, the more likely it is that you will be interviewed or supervised by someone younger than you.

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search, LinkedIn, Resume, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • November 20, 2014

Are you considering a career move? If so, you may want to take geography into account. You may not have noticed, but cities attract and nurture clusters of workers with complementary and contrasting skills. So you may be interested in an area that has a rich environment of talent in your specialty. Or you may want to find a place where you’d stand out by offering a unique capability.

By mining skills and locations of LinkedIn users, the professional social network built a map that highlights the skills which define almost every major city in each region. You can see from the sample set below that there are very different pockets of skill sets across the US.

Screen shot 2014-11-20 at 2.17.04 PM

Chicago, IL
Top Skill Category: Business
Top Skills: Market Research and Insights, Trading and Investment, Account Management

Madison, WI
Top Skill Category: Farm & Agriculture
Top Skills: Farm & Agriculture, Life Sciences, Chemistry

New York City, NY
Top Skill Category: Finance
Top Skills: Trading and Investment, Fashion Clothing, Theatre and Drama

Sacramento, CA
Top Skill Category: Real Estate
Top Skills: Ecology & Environmental Science, Integrated Circuit Design, Renewable Energy

Austin, TX
Top Skill Category: Computer
Top Skills: Integrated Circuit Design, Game Development, Embedded System

You can see the full list of cities and interactive map here. If you’re considering a career move, keep in mind that the professional attributes of a city can matter just as much as the attributes of a particular company.

Posted in Job Search, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • October 24, 2014

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere are many different purposes for networking – to meet new people in your industry, to get your name out there, and even to find a new job. But how do you answer “what do you do?” when you’re looking for a new career? Do you talk about what you have been doing or what you wish to be doing? The Ladders have come up with alternative conversation entry points to help you steer networking conversations with confidence.

“I work in X industry doing Y.”
In this case, Y is your broader career goal rather than your current job description. The next question in the conversation will likely be about what you do and the future of your work.

“I am trying to figure out where to go from X, taking time to figure it out and plotting my next move.”
In this instance, X will be an explanation of the last work project you were excited about. Choose a project about which you know a great deal. Before you finish your conversation, ask the other person, “What do you think your next career move will be?” This conversation opener tends to create discussions about life in general.

“I’m learning about X right now, which is very exciting. What are you learning about in your work?”
With this response, you will likely be asked why and how you are learning X. If you are excited about learning and expanding your skill set, this is your perfect introduction.

With these alternative introductions, you can direct your conversations. Try writing out your answers to the conversation starters above so you will be ready to succeed at your next networking event.

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search, Networking, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • September 18, 2014

fired - paid forBeing downsized is one of the most dreadful things that can happen during your professional life. Whether or not your job is currently in jeopardy, you may become a victim of downsizing at some point in your career. What do you do?

Consider the guidelines below on how to manage being downsized, should you ever find yourself suddenly out of a job.

  1. Get angry… later. It’s easy to react with hostility when you’re told that you’re being downsized, but don’t. It’s only human to be upset but acting on those feelings may do harm to a valued relationship that you may not be able to undo.
  2. Don’t take it personally. Sometimes things happen to us that have absolutely nothing to do with who we are o what we’ve done.
  3. Ask for a recommendation. Get a recommendation in writing as soon as possible from your current boss. You can even volunteer to write it yourself. If you don’t receive a recommendation in a timely manner, ask your boss to send a short email or two-line testimonial.
  4. Be a self-promoter. Now is the time to put aside the belief that it’s wrong to toot your own horn.
  5. Grief is good. Grief is a natural response to losing something. It’s a sign of strength, not weakness, to seek counseling in the wake of being downsized.
  6. Accentuate the positive. It may be possible that one of the worst things that could happen to you might turn out to be the best.

Have you recently been downsized? I can provide the tools, perspectives, exercises, and general assistance that will assist you in opening the doors to the career path you desire and deserve. Contact me to learn more today.

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • September 12, 2014

You may be a seasoned professional, but it’s always smart to brush up on your professional etiquette. If you want to leave a positive and lasting impression, you need to know what to say and how to act.

Careerealism has created a quiz to test your professional etiquette. Take a minute to answer the professional etiquette questions below:

1. Your email address looks most like:
(a) John@JohnSmith.com
(b) John.Smith@gmail.com
(c) MrSmitty86@hotmail.com

2. After a job interview, you:
(a) Send a thank you note right away
(b) Send a thank you note a couple of days later
(c) Don’t send a thank you note

3. During meetings, you:
(a) Pay attention closely, ask questions and take notes
(b) Listen, but only speak up when you’re called on
(c) Text the entire time

4. Your emails are generally:
(a) Brief and to the point, but well-written
(b) Long and vague
(c) Riddles with both spelling and grammatical errors

Okay, you’ve probably caught on by now — if you answered mostly As you’re an expert at professional etiquette. You know exactly what to do when it comes to etiquette in the workplace. If you answered mostly Bs, you know the basics but there are a few situations that you don’t know how to answer. Mostly Cs? Your etiquette skills need work. Figure out which areas you need to improve and work on them.

You can take the full 10-question quiz below:

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Job Search, Rodas Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 29, 2014

linkedin makeoverI’ve talked a lot about the benefits of using LinkedIn to find a job. It’s one of the most useful social sites for networking and job searching, but you may not be maximizing what it can do for you.

Below are three commonly misused LinkedIn features. Use these tips make LinkedIn work for your job search.

  • Headline – Your headline functions the same way the headline of an advertisement would – its primary purpose is to get the audience to want to read more. If you currently have your job title as your headline, it may not be working for you. Use your headline to tell viewers what you can do for them. If you want to be found in a search, you have to pack your headline with the keywords for which you want to be known (and keep it under 120 characters.)
  • Groups – Are you using groups to build your network? Like-minded professionals in your group can help you reach your goals by being a regular part of the conversation. You can also use groups to get introduced to new resources and open doors to prospective clients or employers.
  • Headshot – People want to connect a face with a name. A professional headshot will add credibility to your profile and get you noticed. Try to have your face take up about 80% of the space and face forward or to the left, looking into your LinkedIn content.

What other LinkedIn features have helped you with your job search? You can connect with me on LinkedIn here.

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search, LinkedIn, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • July 24, 2014

Screen shot 2014-07-24 at 3.15.46 PMBased on the book, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” YouTern came up with seven traits closely associated with job seekers who routinely enjoy career success.

Highly successful job seekers:

  • Are proactive – They know how fickle the job market is so they adopt a proactive mentality and are always prepared for the next opportunity. They make sure their career marketing documents – resumes, portfolios, LinkedIn profiles – are up-to-date.
  • Exude confidence – They know their value and the contributions they have made and are able to articulate that with confidence.
  • Invest in their careers – They assess their personal strengths and recognize their areas for growth.
  • Have a circle of influence – They have built their own circle of influence because they know they cannot accomplish much on their own and they need the support of others to succeed. It includes individuals whose career trajectory they would like to emulate.
  • Are active on social media – They know that social media is an equal opportunity platform that offers opportunities to have a presence, drive engagement and build credibility.
  • Demonstrate cross-cultural competency – They make a deliberate effort to operate in different cultural settings because they know the value of having diverse groups of people working together.
  • Know how to collaborate in virtual teams – They have well-developed skills to work productively and cooperatively in virtual teams.

After reading tho traits above, ask yourself how many of these habits you consistently demonstrate.

 

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.