Open Door Blog » Category: "career"
  • June 15, 2016

rodas coaching building an effective teamTeam building is an important aspect of being a manager. Most organizations know the importance of building and fostering teams, but building an effective team requires ongoing work and input from managers. Rather than limiting teams to what each member can do on their own, the key is to unite your team around a common goal, which will raise productivity.

Huffington Post shares five steps to build an effective team:

  • Establish leadership – Managers need to develop the right kind of leadership skills, so that employees will work effectively on their own. Instead of asserting authority, foster trust through honesty and transparency.
  • Form relationships with employees – Learn more about each team member, like their skill sets and how they’re motivated. This information is invaluable to leaders because they can match each employee’s expertise and competencies. Giving your team open-ended projects will allow them to determine the best solution and encourage them to cooperate.
  • Build relationships between employees – Examine the way your team works together and try to improve communication and cooperation. If there is conflict, act as the mediator.
  • Encourage teamwork – Help your team work together effectively by encouraging them to share information among themselves and within the organization.
  • Set ground rules – Include your team in creating team values and goals, so they know what is required and they agree to it.

What tips do you have to build an effective team? Share what has worked for you in the comment box below.

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Leadership, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • March 24, 2016

According to a new study, your Myers-Briggs personality type (MBTI) could predict what your career path will look like. Yes, your chances of career success could depend on whether you’re an ENFJ or ISFP.

Not familiar with Myers-Briggs? The personality assessment traces the patterns in your behavior and assigns you to one of 16 personality types. It gives you a framework for understanding yourself and appreciating the differences in others. You can take the Myers-Briggs personality assessment here.

Over 25,000 people participated in the MBTI study and it broke down how people with different Myers-Briggs personality types fair when it comes to job satisfaction, performance and even average income. The study found that your personality type can make a huge impact on your career path.

Screen shot 2016-03-29 at 12.42.01 PM

Study highlights:

  • Extroverts report higher job satisfaction than Introverts
  • Judgers earn more than Perceivers
  • Thinkers supervise more people on average than Feelers
  • Intuitives are more likely to be self-employed that Sensors

You can see the full study findings here.

 

Posted in career, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • December 30, 2014

targetThink back to this time last year and the New Year’s resolutions and goals that you made – did you stick with them? If you’re like most people then probably not. What if this year could be different? It can!

TED tells us that there’s a science to setting goals. Kelly McGonigal, a psychologist at Stanford, shares four research-backed tips to help you craft and carry out successful goals below.

  • Choose a goal that matters
    Our brains are wired to love rewards so we often set simple goals but a meaningful goal requires going deeper. Think about what you want in the coming year and then ask yourself why you want that – three times in a row. This will drive home why that goal matters and that motivation can help you as you work toward that goal.
  • Focus on the process
    When we set goals, it’s easy to focus on the outcome when we’ve reached the goal. Ask yourself, what is the smallest thing I can do today that helps me reach my goal?
  • Frame your goals positively
    How you describe your goals makes a big difference. Focus on what you want to bring to life, not what you want to avoid.
  • Prepare for failure
    Moments of failure are inevitable but we can’t abandon the goal entirely when minor setbacks start piling up. Ask yourself, how am I likely to fail? That mental plan can help you react to things that might trip you up.

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Life Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • December 11, 2014

lightsThere are plenty of things to distract us from work the is time of year – holiday gatherings, office parties, traveling, etc. Luckily, Kory Kogan, a global productivity practice leader for Franklin Covey, spoke with Fast Company about how to focus on what you need to be successful this holiday season.

  • Be Intentional – Kogan recommends the 30-10 promise to stay focused during this hectic season. Before the week starts, spend 30 minutes thinking about what needs to be done and prioritize that list. At the end of each day, reconcile your list.
  • Take a Break – Research shows that even a 10-minute break during the day can increase productivity.
  • Say No – Don’t be afraid to say “no” to festive events. The key to managing holiday invites is being intentional. Decide what’s important for you at the moment and ask yourself whether each invitation is going to help you achieve that goal.
  • Set Expectations – Be realistic about how much you can do and handle. Let others know what they can expect from you to help ease your anxiety over full voice mailbox or a cluttered inbox.

You can see even more tips on staying productive during the holidays here.

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Rodas Coaching, stress management

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • September 12, 2014

You may be a seasoned professional, but it’s always smart to brush up on your professional etiquette. If you want to leave a positive and lasting impression, you need to know what to say and how to act.

Careerealism has created a quiz to test your professional etiquette. Take a minute to answer the professional etiquette questions below:

1. Your email address looks most like:
(a) John@JohnSmith.com
(b) John.Smith@gmail.com
(c) MrSmitty86@hotmail.com

2. After a job interview, you:
(a) Send a thank you note right away
(b) Send a thank you note a couple of days later
(c) Don’t send a thank you note

3. During meetings, you:
(a) Pay attention closely, ask questions and take notes
(b) Listen, but only speak up when you’re called on
(c) Text the entire time

4. Your emails are generally:
(a) Brief and to the point, but well-written
(b) Long and vague
(c) Riddles with both spelling and grammatical errors

Okay, you’ve probably caught on by now — if you answered mostly As you’re an expert at professional etiquette. You know exactly what to do when it comes to etiquette in the workplace. If you answered mostly Bs, you know the basics but there are a few situations that you don’t know how to answer. Mostly Cs? Your etiquette skills need work. Figure out which areas you need to improve and work on them.

You can take the full 10-question quiz below:

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Job Search, Rodas Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 14, 2014

Boy SilhouetteWhat qualities make a strong leader? In one leadership study, qualities such as assertiveness, adaptability, intelligence and conscientiousness were cited as most important.

So how can you embrace these characteristics and become a better leader? Consider the following tips:

  1. Learn More About Your Leadership Style – Understanding your current leadership style is crucial. What are your strengths? Weaknesses? Take this leadership style quiz to asses your skills. Once you’ve determined areas that need some work, you can begin looking for ways  to improve your leadership abilities.
  2. Serve as a Role Model – Transformational leaders exemplify the behaviors and characteristics that they encourage in their followers. In other words, walk the walk and talk the talk. Work on modeling qualities that you would like to see in your team members to become a better leader.
  3. Listen and Communicate Effectively – Good leaders should express sincere care and concern for the members of their group both verbally and non-verbally. Keeping the lines of communication open ensures that group members feel able to make contributions.
  4. Have a Positive Attitude – Have an upbeat, optimistic attitude to be a source of inspiration for your followers. Even when things look bleak, try to stay positive.
  5. Motivate Your Followers – Inspirational motivation encourages followers to get into action. Being inspirational isn’t always easy but try being passionate about ideas, offering recognition and rewarding accomplishments.

What characteristics do you admire in great leaders?

Posted in career, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • April 29, 2014

linkedin makeoverJust because you have created a LinkedIn profile doesn’t guarantee that recruiters are going to find you. In order to land your dream job, you need to actually do something with your LinkedIn account. Below are a few LinkedIn reminders for job seekers from YouTern:

  • You never know who your friends know – The kid that cuts your grass? His dad is the CEO of XYZ Company. Your neighbor? He used to work at XYZ Company and knows lots of employees there. A business card won’t tell you any of this but LinkedIn can. Start connecting with people you know to begin building your network.
  • Leverage keywords or get left behind – 93% of recruiters used LinkedIn to hire last year! They search for specific keywords to find resumes that contain the right combination of those words. If your resume doesn’t contain those specific terms then you won’t be found. Look at descriptions for your dream job and note which skills and keywords are used in the description. Make sure your LinkedIn resume contains those keywords and is varied in its language to incorporate each possible way of saying the same thing. For example, “recruiter” versus “talent acquisition”.
  • Use LinkedIn to follow up – You can’t just apply for a job online and cross your fingers that you’ll here back. You must do something to stand out from the pack. After applying online, always follow up. LinkedIn is the perfect way to do this by searching for recruiters and hiring managers at that company. Reach out to them and let them know that you’ve applied online and wanted to state your interest in working for XYZ Company.

After you’ve spent some time optimizing your LinkedIn profile to land your dream job, connect with me on LinkedIn.

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Job Search, LinkedIn, Social Media

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • March 21, 2014

linkedin makeoverWhen was the last time you evaluated your LinkedIn profile? You don’t need to do a full analysis, just a quick check up to see if all of the important information is there. If you have 10 minutes to spare then you’ve got time for a LinkedIn profile makeover.

  • Update your profile photo – Is it time to update your profile photo? Careerealism recommends using a head shot that zooms in on your face so that viewers are able to recognize you if they met you in person.
  • Infuse your title with keywords – The title/tagline block is where LinkedIn draws keywords from when ranking profiles in searches. You have 120 characters to clarify your skills, credentials or career goals.
  • Warm up your Summary – Many profiles are written in the third person, but first person language is warmer and carries more of your personality.
  • Add to your Skills & Expertise section – LinkedIn allows you to list up to 50 skills and areas of expertise on your profile so take advantage.

LinkedIn is important to career management these days so take a few minutes to freshen your LinkedIn profile. You can see more tips on updating your profile here.

Posted in career, Career Coaching, LinkedIn, Social Media

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • October 24, 2013

create a brag sheetIt’s important to know your strengths when trying to find a job. What are you great at? Which skill sets are most useful? What type of work environments do you thrive in? One way to keep track of your strengths and interests is a brag sheet.

What is a brag sheet? The Ladders defines a brag sheet as a place to record all your professional accomplishments and contributions.  Here are five tips to help you build your own powerful brag sheet that can help advance your career:

  1. Be results oriented
    When chronicling your accomplishments, think in terms of results.  What was the outcome of your actions? Did you reduce costs or grow sales? Even if you can’t think of numbers, try to think in terms of better, faster and cheaper.
  2. Capture the little details
    Include relevant details like dates, locations, and the names of people and organizations that were involved in your work. Add in client reviews, customer testimonials, and other kudos you’ve received from colleagues and managers.
  3. Don’t become stagnant
    Your brag sheet is a living document and should be updated on a regular basis. Carve out at least an hour each quarter to add new events and review your brag sheet.
  4. Brag with your bullet points
    When updating your resume, identify the accomplishments and contributions that are most relevant to your career goals and use those to craft the bullets under each of your previous roles.
  5. Prepare for negotiations with data
    It’s much easier to negotiate with confidence when you’re armed with data. You don’t need to bring your brag sheet to your interview, but you should be able to cite some recent accomplishments that demonstrate the value you bring to the organization.

Take some time to create your own brag sheet using these tips.

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Interview, Job Search, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 9, 2013

blogJob seekers today are finding new ways to catch the attention of employers.  These savvy seekers are putting their skills to the test and blogging their way to job opportunities.

Why start a blog?  Blogging gives you the opportunity to write about a sector, interview industry experts, attend conferences in your field, define and redefine your point of view to get the attention of those in your chosen field who may want to hire you.

Below are blogging best practices from Forbes:

First Have a Goal
Your blog can be anything you want.  But to make it work for you, you should first have a goal, says John Rampton, founder of Blogging.org and PPC.org.  Rampton said it’s important to figure out what you want your blog to do, and to figure out the topics and, importantly, the keywords, to use in your posts.

What’s Your Business Model?
According to social media consultant Jay Baer, you also need to figure out your business model before you start.  Do you want your blog to drive consulting work, do you want to get paid for blogging, do you want to get a job out of it?  Baer suggests bloggers sharpen their focus by identifying the audience they’re targeting and the questions that audience has so they can provide the right answers.

Blog on Schedule
Most blogging experts concur that if you don’t publish regularly, you’ll fail to get traction.  The more you post, the more eyeballs ultimately find their way to your blog, with the majority of eyeballs coming through search.  And the more you use popular keywords for your category, they higher you will rank with Google, the holy grail of bloggers (and pretty much everybody.)

Help Your Readers
Keep in mind that to get readers you need to provide a service in the form of information and problem-solving.  Think about the problems your target audience currently has, and who, if not you, might have some answers.  That question will guide your interviewing efforts and help you identify and find resolution for issues in your new sector.  Sharing the goal of helping others should embolden you to reach out to industry experts since showcasing their ideas on your blog is beneficial to them and their organization.

Be Visible on Social Media
Don’t neglect to have a social strategy for your blog posts.  Get the word out about each post on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook as a start.

Posted in career, Career Coaching, Job Search, Social Media

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.