Open Door Blog » 2014 » August
  • August 29, 2014

linkedin makeoverI’ve talked a lot about the benefits of using LinkedIn to find a job. It’s one of the most useful social sites for networking and job searching, but you may not be maximizing what it can do for you.

Below are three commonly misused LinkedIn features. Use these tips make LinkedIn work for your job search.

  • Headline – Your headline functions the same way the headline of an advertisement would – its primary purpose is to get the audience to want to read more. If you currently have your job title as your headline, it may not be working for you. Use your headline to tell viewers what you can do for them. If you want to be found in a search, you have to pack your headline with the keywords for which you want to be known (and keep it under 120 characters.)
  • Groups – Are you using groups to build your network? Like-minded professionals in your group can help you reach your goals by being a regular part of the conversation. You can also use groups to get introduced to new resources and open doors to prospective clients or employers.
  • Headshot – People want to connect a face with a name. A professional headshot will add credibility to your profile and get you noticed. Try to have your face take up about 80% of the space and face forward or to the left, looking into your LinkedIn content.

What other LinkedIn features have helped you with your job search? You can connect with me on LinkedIn here.

Posted in Career Coaching, Job Search, LinkedIn, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 27, 2014

linkedin makeoverAre you making LinkedIn work for you? Are you hitting the LinkedIn goals you set for yourself? If not, you may not be putting forth enough effort to really engage with others on LinkedIn. To do that, you must include information in your profile that shows you are good at what you do and that you are an expert in your field. You must demonstrate your expertise and your passion for your profession through status updates, discussions in groups and comments on other people’s updates.

Whether you have three-minutes or 30-minutes to spend on LinkedIn, YouTern tells you how to make the most of LinkedIn features:

Low Efforts – Good Results

  • Include a specific call to action on one section of your profile (Summary and/or job experiences sections)
  • Add your specific contact information in your Contact Info and Advice for Contacting sections

Medium Effort – Better Results

  • Post a daily status update
  • Add Publications or Projects sections to your profile
  • Comment on the updates and published posts of influences in your industry

High Effort – Best Results

  • Share articles you’ve written using LinkedIn’s Published Post feature
  • Post frequent individual status updates
  • Post or monitor group discussions relevant to your industry

You can connect and engage with me on LinkedIn here.

Posted in Career Coaching, LinkedIn, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 22, 2014

1328153_73423240We make decisions all the time, some that require more thought than others. Regardless of the effort that is put into making a decision, it has to be accepted that some decisions will not be the best possible choice.

Many different techniques of decision making have been developed, ranging from simple rules of thumb to extremely complex procedures. The method usually depends on the nature of the decision and how complex it is. Below is one technique that will help you be more effective in decision making.

Seven Stages of Decision Making:

  1. Listing all possible solutions/options – Brainstorm all possible solutions and/or options available
  2. Setting a time scale and deciding who is responsible for the decision – Decide how much time is available to spend on the decision
  3. Information gathering – Collect all relevant information
  4. Weighing the risks involved – Decide how much risk you are willing to take
  5. Deciding on values – Depending on which values are considered important to you, different opinions will seem more or less attractive
  6. Weighing the pros and cons – Consider the possible advantages and disadvantages
  7. Making the decision!

Are you currently weighing a tough decision? Maybe you’re contemplating relocating for a career. Or perhaps you’re trying to decide whether to stay in your current career. Decisions like these are exactly what I am trained to help you answer and accomplish. Contact me to get started.

re you stuck trying to decide whether to stay in your field or leave? – See more at: http://rodascoaching.com/for-career-coaching/#sthash.iiv4AfLQ.dpuf
re you stuck trying to decide whether to stay in your field or leave? – See more at: http://rodascoaching.com/for-career-coaching/#sthash.iiv4AfLQ.dpuf

Posted in Career Coaching, Rodas Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 20, 2014

balanceAre you faced with a tough choice? Chances are the hard choice is something big and momentous for you. Hard choices seem to be occasions for agonizing but philosopher Ruth Chang thinks we have misunderstood hard choices and the role they play in our lives.

What makes a choice hard is the way the alternatives relate. In an easy choice, one alternative is better than the other. In a hard choice, neither is better than the other overall.

Many of us take the safest option in hard choices. It’s a mistake to think that, in hard choices, one alternative really is better than the other. Even taking two alternatives side-by-side with full information can still be a hard choice. Hard choices are hard because there is no best option.

Chang likes to say that alternatives are “on par.” When alternatives are in the same league of value, that’s when the choice is hard. When we choose between options that are on par, we can put ourselves behind an option. Here’s where I stand. Here’s who I am. This kind of response to a hard choice is a rational response, not dictated by reasons given to us, but supported by reasons created by us.

So when faced with hard choices, we shouldn’t be trying to figure out which alternative is better. There is no best alternative. Instead, look for reasons inside: Who am I to be?

You can see Chang’s full TED Talk on how to make hard choices here.

Posted in Uncategorized

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 14, 2014

Boy SilhouetteWhat qualities make a strong leader? In one leadership study, qualities such as assertiveness, adaptability, intelligence and conscientiousness were cited as most important.

So how can you embrace these characteristics and become a better leader? Consider the following tips:

  1. Learn More About Your Leadership Style – Understanding your current leadership style is crucial. What are your strengths? Weaknesses? Take this leadership style quiz to asses your skills. Once you’ve determined areas that need some work, you can begin looking for ways  to improve your leadership abilities.
  2. Serve as a Role Model – Transformational leaders exemplify the behaviors and characteristics that they encourage in their followers. In other words, walk the walk and talk the talk. Work on modeling qualities that you would like to see in your team members to become a better leader.
  3. Listen and Communicate Effectively – Good leaders should express sincere care and concern for the members of their group both verbally and non-verbally. Keeping the lines of communication open ensures that group members feel able to make contributions.
  4. Have a Positive Attitude – Have an upbeat, optimistic attitude to be a source of inspiration for your followers. Even when things look bleak, try to stay positive.
  5. Motivate Your Followers – Inspirational motivation encourages followers to get into action. Being inspirational isn’t always easy but try being passionate about ideas, offering recognition and rewarding accomplishments.

What characteristics do you admire in great leaders?

Posted in career, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 11, 2014

It’s possible that your resume could be saying the wrong thing about you. Your resume is a reflection of you and you don’t want recruiters thinking that you’re outdated because your resume is. Does your resume need an update? The Ladders blog will help you figure it out:

  • Listing a home phone number – In this mobile age, it’s importation to be accessible when a recruiter tries to contact you. Listing your cell phone number, rather than your home phone number, on your resume will enable you to maintain contact during the recruiter’s workday and will also give you control over who answers.
  • No profile URL – Recruiters are likely to look at a candidate’s social media profiles. Include a URL to your LinkedIn profile (or other social media professional profile) so recruiters don’t have to guess or mistake you for someone else.
  • Resume Objective – These days, a professional summary is better than an objective because it tells the employer how you’ll meet their needs. Sell your job candidacy by giving the reader your elevator pitch and explain what you’re best at and how you can provide value to a prospective employer.

Posted in Resume, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 8, 2014

to do listAccording to Forbes, 40% of adults say they lie in bed awake at night plagued by the stressful events of the day. Do you fall into that 40%? It’s hard not to, as the average business professional has an average of 31 to 100 projects on their plate and is interrupted seven times an hour at work!

So, how can you maintain a steady focus throughout the day and still have energy left over after work? Sharon Melnick, Ph.D., a business psychologist, offers the following strategies to manage stress at work.

  • Take a Deep Breath – It sounds easy enough, but do you put this exercise to use? If you’re feeling overwhelmed or need to clear your head, a few minutes of deep breathing will restore balance. Try inhaling for five seconds, holding and exhaling in equal counts through the nose.
  • Eat Right and Sleep Well – Getting enough sleep is critical for the body to recover. If racing thoughts keep you up at night, try this simple breathing trick from Melnick: Cover your right nostril and breathe through your left for three to five minutes.
  • Identify Self-Imposed Stress: I f you’re too caught up in others’ perceptions of you, which you can’t control, you become stressed out by the minutia.
  • Prioritize Your Priorities: With competing deadlines and fast-changing priorities, it’s crucial to understand your role in the organization, the company’s priorities, and your personal goals and strengths. Focus on the projects that will have the most impact and are best aligned with your goals.

Are you feeling overwhelmed by work stress? Contact me for a free consultation on how I can help you achieve your career goals.

Posted in Career Coaching, stress management

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • August 6, 2014

Believe it or not, stress isn’t the enemy. In fact, changing how you think about stress can make you healthier. When you change your mind about stress, you can change your body’s response to stress.

Typically we interpret feelings of stress (heart pounding, fast breathing, breaking into a sweat) as anxiety but what if we viewed them as signs that our body is energizing and preparing to meet a challenge?

Kelly McGonigal, a health psychologist, shared a new study that found if you think of your stress response as helpful (your pounding heart is preparing you for action; breathing faster is getting more oxygen to your brain), you will not only be less stressed but also less anxious and more confident.

This one change could make a huge difference in your everyday life. The next time you feel your body responding to stress think to yourself ,“This is my body helping me rise to this challenge.”

You can see Ms. McGonigal’s full TED Talk on how to make stress your friend below.

Posted in stress management

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.