Open Door Blog » 2014 » February
  • February 25, 2014

SONY DSCAs humans, we are inherent seekers of truth.  Whether we are trying to comprehend our true life purpose, make a truthful decision, or decipher if someone if telling us the truth, it is natural for us to extract truth from all matter of life. But your truth must be grasped firmly. So long as we are ready to face it, the truth is no further than a few steps down the inner road.

Alexandra Harra, a certified life coach, gives a number of routes we can take on our journey towards truth. Reflect on which of these approaches is best for you:

  • Honor your needs – There are questions you must ask yourself when faced with a choice: what, why, and for whom? Most of the time, the answer to each of these should include a “me” or “I.”
  • Listen – The people around you can help you establish truth, if you are willing to listen. Ask three people whom you trust fully for unfiltered advice. Listen openly and without interruption. A fresh perspective helps detangle truth from frustrating, personal sentiments.
  • Examine history – Truth represents itself throughout history. If you acted in a way that hurt you in the past, acting in a similar way will hurt you in the future. Learn from your own history and base your truth on the lessons you’ve learned.

There are a number of routes you can take on your journey towards truth. You can see all 10 approaches here.

Posted in health, Life Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • February 14, 2014

sky diverMany people, particularly as they accumulate years of work experience, find they have a growing desire to put passion into their life and career. As we grow in life experiences a lot of the excitement or “newness” diminishes. We simply have been there and done that enough that our threshold for what will rock our world continues to go up. It’s increasingly harder to get that same level of excitement.

As we recognize that this element of excitement is missing, it can trigger us to go in search of something we can feel passionate about. The biggest issue with going in search of your life and career passion is: How do you find your passion?

All too many people think that your passion just comes to you like a thunderbolt from the heavens. In other words, we think for some people it just magically appears. This leaves the rest of us to feel unlucky because the magic hasn’t happened. Finding your passion is something we all have access to. It might seem magical, but it is simply a process, like most things in our lives, and requires turning off the TV and taking some actions.

Here are 5 simple steps that will lead you to finding your passion:

  1. Start first with what you already know you’re interested in. Sit down and write out a list of all the things you have some interest in trying, but never have. Your whole process requires self honesty and it starts here.
  2. Make goals. Create your list of goals, and prepare to take action towards those goals. Like all great goals, they have the characteristics of 1) being specific 2) having a time for completion 3) and are actionable.
  3. Get curious and go in search. Your biggest asset on your quest to find passion is to get curious about your environment and what other people are doing. Ask questions. Surround yourself with people who are passionate about the work they are doing or with people on a quest like you. Having others in your life, who are excited about life, will drive your process forward. It’s great to have daily doses of inspiration.
  4. Record your results in writing. To get the most out of your exploration, you need to spend time in introspection. You need to think about each action you take and your reactions to them. This will help you understand what works for you and what doesn’t.
  5. Repeat. Don’t try something just once. Continue to move through the steps exploring, experimenting and learning until you discover the passion you are looking for in your life.

Once found, follow your passion and you will find the power to awaken the beauty of the world and bring it into your life.

Posted in Career Coaching, Life Coaching, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • February 6, 2014

emotional intelligence at workEmotional intelligence, commonly described as common sense, is defined as the ability to identify, assess, and control the emotions of oneself, of others, and of groups. Our emotional intelligence – the way we manage emotions, both our own and those of others – can play a critical role in determining our happiness and success, and a lot of your success and happiness is dependent on how you interact with others—in all jobs.

What can you do to sharpen your emotional intelligence? CareerBliss spoke with a number of psychologists and experts on the topic to pinpoint practical ways to practice strong emotional intelligence at work.

  1. Set an Intention – To control an outcome, you first have to clarify your intention.  “Before you start a project, meeting, or conversation, ask yourself: What is my intention? What do I most want to see happen from this?” says Amita Patel, owner and founder of Aligned Holistics. If you didn’t get what you were looking for, consider rephrasing your question. Looking inwardly can boost your interpersonal skills.
  2. Destress – Stress is kind of like a fog machine for your emotional intelligence. When you’re incredibly stressed out, it’s harder to see interactions clearly. For instance, “Many of us suffer from Email Apnea. Simply put, it means we hold our breath as we’re checking & writing email like a bomb is about to go off. Focus on creating a rhythm of calm & steady breaths,” Patel says. This can help you relax.
  3. Practice Kindness – Simple acts of kindness is always great for building strong relationships in general. Even if it’s as small as flashing a smile and saying “good morning.” Patel suggests: “Hold an elevator door, thank someone sincerely, or listen to someone mindfully without distractions.”

Putting these tactics into practice is a great way to connect your mind and heart for more success and happiness at work.

Posted in Career Coaching, health, Rodas Coaching, Skills

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.