Open Door Blog » 2013 » November
  • November 28, 2013

give thanksI am grateful for having connected with each and everyone of you and hope that this Thanksgiving brings you much Peace, Joy and Happiness with friends and family gathered around to celebrate this wonderful holiday.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Posted in Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • November 26, 2013

cornucopiaFor many of us, Thanksgiving Day is traditionally a day that involves eating lots of good food, spending time with family and maybe watching a football game or two. Most importantly, it’s a day to count our blessings and give thanks. The positive benefits associated with gratitude are many, and there are ways you can keep the attitude of gratitude going strong in your life every day.

Here are some ideas:

  • Live in Thanksgiving every day by giving to others. This can be something like helping out a neighbor, spending time with a friend who’s having a hard time, donating to a charity, or doing volunteer work.
  • Every day think of one thing that you are grateful for and write it down on paper. Spend a few minutes immersing yourself in this feeling of gratitude and offer up your thanks, whether through prayer or just a simple thank you to the universe.
  • People want to feel appreciated, so express your thanks to a family member or friend who has always been there for you. Say thank you to people you meet throughout the day, such as the helpful grocery clerk, the co-worker who did a good job, or the person who lets you go ahead of them in line.
  • Give thanks for the food you have every day, and reflect upon the nourishment it gives to your body.
  • Show your gratitude to the earth we live on by treating it with respect. Recycle, cut back on electricity use, conserve water and any other steps you can take to keep the planet healthy.
  • Find gratitude in the mistakes that you make. Realize that these can be valuable opportunities for growth and learning.
  • Spend some time walking through your home and notice the things you are particularly grateful for. Or, you can think about special memories that come to mind in the different rooms of your home. Offer a prayer of thanks or spend some time in joyful reflection.
  • By making gratitude a part of your daily life you can create more joy in your spirit and in the lives of others. Keep gratitude alive in your heart and make every day Thanksgiving Day.

Posted in health, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • November 21, 2013

keyboardAre your LinkedIn efforts paying off for finding a job? Are you putting in the right amount of time to get your profile noticed? LinkedIn is at its best when maintained regularly and optimized to allow hiring managers to reach out to you.

Mashable spoke with LinkedIn’s career expert, Nicole Williams, who provided these six tips to optimize your LinkedIn profile to attract more recruiters to you:

1. Develop a Keyword Strategy
If search engine optimization is not your expertise, here is a mini lesson. LinkedIn’s search functionality makes it easy to find people by their name, skills and any other words that appear in their profile — which is why these words should be chosen with thought.

First, make a list of terms associated with your skills and experience. Ask yourself, “What words would someone search for to find me?”

Next, take those terms and rework them from the perspective of a searching recruiter. For example, you may have the term “digital strategy” in your LinkedIn profile; however, a recruiter would be more likely to search for the term “digital strategist.” You want to organically incorporate these key terms into your profile to attract both the search engine and human reader alike.

2. Say Cheese
Williams says that “hiring managers are seven times more likely to view your profile if you have a photo; it’s a must have.”

Not only does a photo allow your profile to stand out in the search results, but also shows recruiters that you are active on the network and LinkedIn is a viable way to contact you. Williams suggests using a photo that places you in the context of your job. You want to help hiring managers envision you in that position.

3. Be Vain
Williams also prompts all passive and active job seekers to claim their vanity URL. This is a customized URL that drives directly to your profile.

This makes it easier for hiring managers to find you and share your information with other hiring managers. If your preferred vanity URL is already claimed, incorporate a relevant key term, for example www.linkedin.com/in/CarlySimonSinger.

4. Rack up Recommendations
Solicit recommendations from people you have worked for or with. “Make a strategic plan for your recommendations,” says Williams. “Approach different people and suggest particular skills or experiences you would like them to highlight.”

This strategy helps provide hiring managers with a more holistic view of you and your past work. However, the most important part of the recommendation is not necessarily the content, but that it exists at all.

5. Strategic Connections
The more connections you have on LinkedIn the more likely you are to come up in a hiring manager’s search results. Strategically identify people you’d like to be linked to and approach them with a custom connection request.

Groups work similarly and if you and a recruiter are in the same group, you can rise to the top of their search results. Join groups that are relevant to the industry you are in and a few recruiters in your field will most likely be members as well.

6. Now Share with your Connections
“Don’t just set up your profile; actively engage in LinkedIn,” says Williams. Share useful content or comment on the shared content of others to make your profile more viewable. Interacting with others on the platform not only makes you visible to them, but also their connections.

Do you have your LinkedIn tips of your own? Share them in the comment box below. You can connect with me on LinkedIn here.

Posted in Job Search, LinkedIn, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • November 15, 2013

common linkedin termsYou may already have an account on LinkedIn, but do you really understand how to use the networking site? Below is a list of LinkedIn terms and explanations to help you become a LinkedIn pro.

Connections

  • 1st Degree Connections – These are people you’re directly connected to because you have accepted their invitation to connect, or they have accepted yours. You will see a 1st degree icon next to their name in search results and on their profile. You can contact them by sending a LinkedIn message.
  • 2nd Degree Connections – These are people who are connected to your 1st degree connections. You will see a 2nd degree icon next to their name. You can contact them by sending a LinkedIn message.
  • 3rd Degree Connections – These are people who are connected to your 2nd degree connections. You’ll see a 3rd degree icon next to their name. If their full first and last name is displayed, you can send them an invitation by clicking Connect. If only the first letter of their last name is displayed, you can contact them through InMail or an introduction.

InMail

InMail allows you to send messages directly to another LinkedIn member that you’re not connected to. Members must purchase InMail, or you can get them with a Premium LinkedIn account.

Recommendations

A LinkedIn Recommendation is a comment written by a LinkedIn member to recognize or command a colleague, business partner, or student. Recommendations typically come from people who value your work, services, or products. There is no limit to the number of recommendations you can request or give. Benefits of LinkedIn Recommendations include:

  • Helps to find new clients and business partners
  • Builds your reputation

Skill Endorsements

Skill Endorsements are a simple way to recognize your 1st degree connections’ skills and expertise. You may add any skill to this section on your profile. Benefits of Skill Endorsements include:

  • Builds your professional brand
  • Validates your strengths
  • Engages your network

Let’s connect on LinkedIn! You can find my profile at LinkedIn.com/DeborahSakelaris.

Posted in LinkedIn

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.

  • November 7, 2013

Olive Grove at SunsetWhen we think about happiness, many of us think it’s something we have to go get, or that it will come “if only,” (i.e. I’d be happy “if only” I had that great job, I’d be happy “if only” I was married, etc…)

I’d like to invite you to think about happiness in a different way.  Happiness is a choice, really it is.  How do you cultivate happiness in your life? When do you feel happy?  Below are things you can do every day to create more happiness in your life and in others.

Send an Appreciative Email

When you open your inbox for the first time each day, take two minutes to send an email to someone in your social support network (family member, friend, teacher, coach, coworker) praising him/her or thanking that person. Studies from Harvard show this is so powerful that there is actually a correlation between happiness and social connection of 0.7, significantly higher than the correlation between smoking and cancer. Social connection can be as predictive of your longevity as high blood pressure, obesity and smoking.

Smiling Is Contagious

Through a study involving 11,000 hospital employees over six months, it was found that smiling, making eye contact and simply saying hello within 10 feet of another person increased the hospital’s patient satisfaction, the doctors’ job satisfaction, and the likelihood to refer the hospital to others. This is because of the way neurons function in our body, lighting up at the receipt of a friendly gesture, telling our brains to smile when someone smiles at us and spreading the joy all around.

Give Thanks

Think of three things you are grateful for before you go to sleep for 21 days. Write them down on paper.  Being thankful increases our ability to have a positive outlook on life.   A Harvard study showed increasing your optimism can improve your productive energy by 31 percent!

Have Fun

By adding 15 minutes of a fun, mindful activity to your day, like gardening, going on a walk or working out, your brain learns to believe that behaviors matter — the core of optimism. In fact, in one study, researchers took people suffering from depressions and had half take an antidepressant and half do light aerobic exercise in order to train their brain to believe that their behavior matters. While there were equal drops in depression for the first few months, the group that added a habit of exercise had significantly lower chance of relapse back into depression 10 months later. Habits like the “Fun 15″ help your brain record a victory, which creates a “cascade of success,” where individuals start creating a constellation of positive habits around them, decreasing the likelihood for depression and despair.

So remember, Happiness is a choice!  You can choose it any time and take steps to increase it in your life everyday.

Posted in Life Coaching, Rodas Coaching

Written by Deborah O'Donnell

Deborah O'Donnell is the President and Owner of Rodas Coaching, LLC, a Career and Life Coaching firm located in downtown Chicago. She works one-on-one with individuals, executives, and entrepreneurs, helping them gain clarity and align their passions and strengths to open doors to live inspired and balanced lives. Deborah provides career management consulting, which provides resume review, career coaching, and interview skill development.